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20131028
20131105
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Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)
the deficit as well, but it puts people to work: this is important work for all americans. lit's remember, this touches every single american in a very positive way. some of the keys i'd lieblg to em fa sies in this bim,en hansed crop insurance. i've heard from across my state that farmers and rampblers wanten hanszed com snurnsz. that's absolute lip a priority. we need to continue the sugar program, the livestock indemnity program for our producers. we need conservation rules that make sense in the house vergsz, you do tie >> i think that is the right approach, and, obviously, under the current program if enroll in the program, you are also tied to the compliance requirements. we need strong support for ag research. for all of you that live and work in farm country, look what ag research has done for genetics and production. it's unbelievable talking about productivity. we have to support the programs. the senator was nice enough to mention the work done on a bipartisan basis. she's been an absolute leader in the conservation programs, particularly rural water management. the regional co
. the house overwhelmingly passed a similar bill in july. the country's 2013 budget deficit has dropped to just $680 billion. that's its lowest level since 2008. treasury credits higher tax receipts for about 80% of the defic deficit's reduction as tax revenues jump nearly $3 trillion. >>> watch out, opec. texas is in the midst of an oil boom. the eia reports that production in texas is up 29% from last year. if this trend continues, texas crude oil production could surpass all opec members except saudi arabia as early as next year larry? >> you know, thanks. i just add to that, yes, the deficit's come down nicely, but i think these so-called experts aught to see what the budget caps and sequesters have done. spending, discretionary spending, has moved down all the way back to close to 2007, early 2008 levels. and that is some achievement. anyway, thanks very much. >>> now, back to our top story this evening. we have numerous developing stories of new problems and questions about obama care. but first, keeping your insurance plan isn't the only broken promise from president obama on hea
understand, as do the american people, that a $17 trillion national debt and a $700 billion deficit is a serious issue that must be addressed, and the american people know that. do you know what else they understand? they understand that there is an even more important issue out there, and that is that real unemployment today is close to 14%, youth unemployment, an issue that the pope, pope frances is beginning to talk about a great deal in this country is approximately 20%. african-american youth unemployment is over 40%. and what the american people are saying is yes, deal with the deficit but do not forget that we continue to have a major economic crisis with millions and millions of americans unemployed and for many other americans who are working their wages are deplorably low. we have millions of folks working for $8 or $9 an hour who cannot take care of their families under those wages. so while the middle class is disappearing and poverty today, the number of people living in poverty is at an all-time high, we also have another dynamic that we don't talk about too much here
to address the driver of our debt and deficit. we have to don't reduce our deficits which we've cut in half over the last four years. if we don't, interest intense is a very real threat for crowding out both public and private investment in education r&d and infrastructure. over the last three years we've made real strides in reducing our deficit. we saved more than $12.5 billion. that's been unbalanced. about 70% has been from spending cut. 30% from revenue. we need to do more but we have do it, i believe, in a balanced way. we've heard from senators about the need to modernize the tax code and move toward real tax reform. while the committee can't get it done. we can move in that direction in a substantial way. making a modest cut of only 5% of the trillion dollars a year we spend through the tax code would make huge dent in the deficit. lastly, we have to don't make some reduction in direct spending. although i know that's the area taken the hardest hit. i'll insist on doing in a way that put a circle of production around around the most vulnerable and honoring our promises to seniors, v
: i think that the assumption that we were going to reach some grand bargain, a large deficit reduction package over the next 10 years, i think it's clear that the expectations for that have been lowered dramatically. >> host: why? >> guest: because the differences between the house ft and senate are very, very dramatic. almost like we're on different planets even though in the same universe. of theferences in terms house position, in terms of the resolution they passed back in the spring which had no tax increases, no revenue increases, assumed the repeal of the affordable care act, capped block grant at medicaid program antithesis to the senate position. position, budget resolution they passed, senate had about a trillion dollars, $890 billion over thehe next 10 years and, increased in revenues. the differences are so great i think it is probably very unlikely there will be any kind of an agreement to raise revenues because it could not pass in the house of representatives. >> host: sir, does that doom this effort toof failure at outset? >> guest: no, no. i think i?f people
grand bargain, a large deficit package over the next 10 years, i think it's clear the expectations for that happened lowered dramatically. host:why? guest: the differences between the house and senate are dramatic. it is like we are on different planets even though we are in the same universe for it the difference on the house position in terms of the resolution they passed back in the spring which had no tax increases, no revenue increases, assumed to the repeal of the affordable care act. it is the antithesis to the senate position. thesenate budge was resolution they passed. they had increased references -- revenues and a differences are so great it is unlikely there will be any kind of agreement to raise revenues because it could not pass in the house of representatives. host: does that doom this effort to failure? guest: now, if people had expectations that this would be a large deficit reduction package achieved by the hope for a deadline of december 13, i think that is off the table. i think there is a real possibility, not of a grand bargain, but of a bargain that will be g
create jobs, reduce our bunt deficit, including -- budget deficit, including a pathway to citizenship, unite families, it would help reflect values as americans in our immigration laws, grow the economy, create jobs for americans here at home. and finally get real about enforcing our immigration laws. do you realize, mr. speaker, there are over 10 million people in this country illegally? when are we going to get serious about enforcing our laws and not making a mockery of them? this nation is a nation based on the rule of law. h.r. 15 reflects that commitment as does the senate immigration bill. it's time that we fix our broken immigration system rather than go home on a wednesday and meet for 19 days in a 63-day period. this is a bipartisan bill. h.r. 15. we have been joined by several republicans representative denham, representative ros-lehtinen. we encourage my colleagues, i certainly invite my friend and colleague from texas to join us as a co-sponsor of this bill that will allow us to create enforcement, a pathway to citizenship, grow jobs, and finally resolve our broken immigr
negotiate the 19 of the 1990s and deficit reduction act. each individual's health insurance program, earned income tax credit, hope scholarship tax credit in the direct student loan program the between the clinton and obama administration he worked at the brookings institution, the center for american progress, and the council on foreign relations working on a range of economics and education issues. he is the co-author of a book on girls education and an author of the pro-growth progressive and economic strategy for shared prosperity. gene graduated from the university of minnesota and yale law school and attended wharton business school. is a native of ann arbor, michigan, and will be joining his them in california at the end of this year. when he finishes his remarks will move over here for two and a. thank you very much. gene? >> well, thank you very much for having us here today. i want to thank jim doyle very much, not just for today but for all the leadership of business forward, all the consultations, even the recent meeting with your small business advisory committee as we went int
differences. it's not only a farm bill, it's a trade bill, it's a hunger bill, a conservation bill, deficit reduction bill, it's also a job creation bill. we passed a bipartisan bill twice in the senate. we had the republicans and democrats. we each had to give some but we did it. we assured a farm bill that supports nation farmers, rural communities, alleviates hunger, reforms commodity programs, ends trade destroying policy, creates jobs and saves taxpayers $24 billion. not bad. on dairy, farmers across the country support a margin insurance program. one that has to work in tandem with the market stabilization program. i hear this from the kitchen tables to the high school gymnasiums in the farm areas, agriculture areas in my state. we've done that in the senate bill. farmers remember the dairy crisis of 2009. they know the insurance program alone is not enough. if we don't have stabilization, we're going to cost taxpayers hundreds of millions of additional dollars, virtually guarantee another dairy crisis, will put people out of business. so there's a number of other things, which i'll p
, it's a trade bill, a hunger bill, a conservation bill, a reform bill, innovation bill, deficit reduction bill. it's also a job creation bill. we passed a bipartisan bill twice in the senate. we had -- republicans and democrats, we each had to give some, and we did it. it reforms commodity programs, ends trade distorting policy, creates jobs and saves taxpayers $24 billion. not bad. and on dairy, farmers across the country support an insurance program, but one that has to work in tandem with the mark stabilization program. i hear this from the kitchen tables to the high school gymnasiums in my -- in the farm areas, agriculture areas of my state. we've done that in the senate bill. farmers remember the dairy crisis of 2009. they know an insurance program alone is not enough. if we don't have stabilization, we're going to cost taxpayers hundreds of millions of additional dollars and virtually guarantee another dairy price and put people out of business. so there's a number of other things which i will put in the record. we have to have strong nutrition programs. i think of people
have a trillion dollar deficits. >> and it doesn't look like the republicans are helping us any, so will he write a book for them? >> well, let me say something about that. i think the republicans, you know, there are people all across the spectrum in both parties, but i was asked, i was speaking about my other book, known and unknown, at fort leavenworth, the military base, not the prison -- [laughter] and there were 1490 majors from mostly our country but from around the world to this big school there. and someone asked me, what's the biggest problem i worry about when i go to bed at night. and the answer was, american weakness. why do i say that? i think the signal that's being sent out from this country is basically we are modeling american economy in europe, and it's a failed model. it doesn't work. there's no way you can have a deficits we have and the debt we are incurring without sending out a signal to the world that this country is not going to be what it was in the past. ..
did not have a deficit problem the -- but that .e had a revenue problem on the floor yesterday he said the american people want to pay more taxes. i am sorry, sir, i do not want to pay more taxes, i barely make it as it is. in youw is your last day guys are taking a vacation again for another 10 days and i would like to know why, when there are so many things that have to be done in congress? guest: well, there is a schedule. as you know, we were supposed to be off two weeks ago when we had the travesty of trying to get the government act opening and. when people say vacation, i know i will be in my district working every day. most congressmen will be doing the same thing, regardless of which side of the aisle. this is not a vacation. people think that if we are not in washington we do not do anything. people have to speak for themselves, i can assure you that is not my cup of tea. your second question about harry reid, there is a problem in terms of revenue. there is a problem that we have in the deficit area the commitment to his cut the deficit in half, which is very good, we are go
of the aspects of the law because, in part, it added hundreds of billions to the deficit and was president paid for unlike the affordable care act, which will actually help lower the deficit. [cheers and applause] >> but you know what? once it was the law everybody pitched in to try to make it work. democrats weren't about to punish millions of seniors to make a point or settle a score. democrats worked with republicans to make it work. and i'm proud of democrats having done that. it was the right thing to do. , about 90% of seniors like what they have. they've gotten a better deal. both parties working together to get the job done. that's what we need in washington right now. that's what we need in washington right now. [cheers and applause] >> you know, republicans in congress were as eager to help americans get covered, some republican governors have shown themselves to be, -- i'm not asking them to agree on everything, but if they worked with us like mitt romney did working with democrats in massachusetts or like ted kennedy often did with republicans did in congress including on the prescr
that it would explode the deficit and yet the reputable organizations like the budget office says it's going to save 100 billion dollars over ten years. so we've had a litany of objections from the republicans about the affordable care act which has driven this to such a frenzy, they even closed the government. so, now, we have you before the committee and you're being asked, i suppose later you'll be asked about the website, but let me pursue this question about individuals have gotten notices that they're going to have their individual insurance policies canceled and they'll be able to get another plan, won't they? >> actually, it's the law that they must get another plan. continuous coverage is part of the law. >> so-- >> and that wasn't the case in the past. >> and the affordable care act, we are going to end the worst abuses of insurance companies. we're going to create consumer protections in the marketplace that they will be able to buy a policy even if they've been sick in the past, that women won't be charged more than men, that we're not going to let insurance companies deny covera
of $4 billion to reduce the deficit. tim friend was at the protest. >> several thousand in kampare and brittany are furious about the ecotax that the president, francis hollande wants to introduce. he's already backtracked slightly. he says he'll suspend it for more talks. but the people here want it scrapped altogether. they say it will jeopardise their livelihoods. brittany has been hit hard by factory closures maybe in the food processing business. they are being undercut by cheap labour elsewhere in the european union. they are angry about germany who is undercutting them. the economy has taken a knock recently, and the focus of the protest has been on this ecotax. just a week ago there were violent clashes with the police, rubber bullets were fired, tear gas fired and the protesters hurled missiles at the police. there were several injuries. a couple of days later the president backtracked. as i say, suspended from further talks. protesters feel they have the initiative, they want him to go further and scrapped. they have been promised more state aid. they are still not happy.
in tax height to reduce the deficit. >> several thousand people here in north-west france. they are furious about the ecotax that the president, president francis hollande wants to introduce. he's already backtracked slightly. he says he'll suspend it. for more talks, but the people here want it scrapped altogether. they say it will jeopardise their livelihoods. brittany has been hit hard by factory clornals. mainly in the food processing business. they say they are being undercut for cheap labour. they are angry about germany, who they say is undercutting them. the economy generally has taken a knock recently and the focus of the protest has been on the ecotax. a week ago there were violent clashes with the police, rubber bullets were fired, tear gas was fired. protesters hurled missiles. there were several injuries. a couple of days later francis hollande backtracked and suspended the tax. protesters feel they have the initiative, they want him to go further. they promised more state aid. they are still not happy and speeches made here before a big march are voicing that
's health. the fourth issue she brought up was the deficit and aca may contribute. guest: the cbo scored that it would actually decrease the deficit. this law, if anything, reduces the deficit or is budget neutral. one of the ideas behind the law is we are going to bring health- care cost under control. we have seen the increase of health care costs start to decline, which is a good sign. that is a huge issue. unless we can stop premiums and costs generally from going up, five percent, 6%, seven percent, every year, we will have spiraling costs. >> do you think social security -- host: aaron smith, do you think social security will be around by the time you get to a retirement age? guest: i am hopeful. i think it will be. it is something that has been a red rock in this country. it is something my parents and grandparents relied on. it is something we are all paying into. so far, i have seen a lot of support, actually, and a lot of opposition to attempts to roll that back. when we have talked to young people about social security -- you definitely hear this skepticism about whether it wi
we would explode the deficit and all the reputable organizations like the congressional budget office told us that it's going to save us $100 billion over ten years. >> now we have the committee and you are being asked later about the website. let me pursue this question about individuals who have gotten notices that they will have their individual insurance policiless canceled. they will be able to get another plan, won't they? >> it's the law that they must. continuous coverage is part of the law. that wasn't the case in the past. >> the affordable care act. we will end the worst abuse of companies and create consumer protections in the market place that they will be able to buy a policy even if they have been sick in the past and women won't be charged more than men. they won't be denied coverage because of preexisting conditions and put lifetime caps and will be an essential benefit package. you are not buying some things and having other things, but the minimum that everybody should have. prescription drugs and mental health coverage and doctors and hospitals. are these important
the economy, creating between half a million and a million jobs, reduces the deficit by over $00 billion, bolsters job creation an strengthens the viability of social security and medicare. what's not to like? let's restore the rule of law to our country. let's improve our security. and let's unite families in human terms to -- yibet families. in human terms the cost of inaction is having a heavy toll. over 100,000 deportations have taken place since the senate passed imfration last june, including thousands who are noncriminals who would have benefited from immigration reform but instead became a cost to the taxpayers to the tune of more than $200,000 each to deport. take a few examples of my district -- from my district of people that immigration reform will help today. diana and cathia are two young women who are high school students brought here from mexico as young children by their parents. they're excellent students, both straight a students, want to go to college. kcathia wans to go toed me cool school, diana wants to study cinematography. both are applicants to the doca program.
. as they go up, subsidies go up. the burden on the taxpayer go up. deficits go up. >> premiums are going up at double-digit increases prior to the affordable care act. we are seeing a moderation of premium increases. >> that is a false dichotomy. i do not accept that as a complete answer on the premiums. transparency is clearly important. you or hhs or cms, somebody ordered -- in the ministration, provide information on the test pairs cost with regard to the subsidies for 2015 and beyond? part of our information and reports we produce will include the information to you, yes. >> thank you. >> thank you very much, mr. chairman. to associate myself with the remarks of mr. thompson. and mr. neale. a focus on an area i think this committee could become imminently involved in. i would like to went out what a success connecticut has been. i would like to commend the governor and lieutenant governor who have headed that up. tremendous success, including more than one third of the people who have signed up for the program, under age 35. it demonstrates when you are working together and cooperating,
. they said that it would explode the deficit and yet all the reputable organizations like the congressional budget office have told us that it's going to save us $100 billion over ten years. so we've had a litany of objections from the republicans about the affordable care act which has driven them to such a frenzy, they even closed the go. . so now we have you before the committee. and you're being asked he i suppose later you'll be asked about the website. but let me pursue this question about individuals have gotten notices that they will have their individual insurance policies canceled. they will be able to get another plan, won't they? >> actually it's the law that they must. tip us coverage is part continuous coverage is part of the law. and that wasn't the case in the past. fr . >> so it said we'll end the worst abuses of insurance companies, we'll create consumer protections in the marketplace. they will be able to buy a policy even if they have been sick in the past, that women won't be charged more than men, that we're not going to let insurance companies deny coverage because of
that it would explode the deficit. and yet all the reputable organizations like the congressional budget office have told us that it is going to save us $100 billion over 10 years. so we've had a litany of objections from the republicans about the affordable care act which have driven them to such a frenzy they even closed the government! so now we have you before the committee. and you're being asked, i suppose later, you will be asked about the website but let me pursue this question about individuals who have gotten notices that they're going to have their individual insurance policies canceled. they will be able to get another plan, won't they. >> actually it is the law they must get another plan. continuous coverage is part of the law. >> so -- >> that wasn't the case in the past. >> so the affordable care act said we're going to end the worst abuses of insurance companies. we're going to create consumer protections in the marketplace they will be able to buy a policy even if they have been sick in the past. that women won't be charged more than men. that we'll not let insurance companies
the deficit and yet all of the reputable organizations like the congressional budget office have told us it will save us $100 billion over ten years. so we've had a litany of objections from the republicans about the affordable care act, which has driven them to such a frenzy, they even closed the government. now we have you before the committee. and you're being asked, i suppose, later about the website. let me pursue this question about individuals who have gotten notices that they're going to have their individual insurance policies canceled. they'll be able to get another plan, won't they? >> actually, it's the law that they must get another plan. continuous coverage is part of the law. and that wasn't the case in the past. >> so the affordable care act said we're going to end the worst abuses of insurance companies. we're going to create consumer protections in the marketplace that they will be able to buy a policy even if they had been sick in the past that women won't be charged more than men, that we're not going to let insurance companies deny coverage because of pre-existing co
since then? i wouldn't blame cuchinelli's deficit in the polls entirely on governor mcdonnell. but if you look about the time that mcdonnell's legal problems, ethical problems came to a head, that's when the momentum shifted in this race. before last spring, early summer, you know, cuchinelli was ahead in some polls, mcauliffe was ahead in some polls. it was a bit of a mix. since mid july, we now have 35 cob second tif polls showing mcauliffe ahead. some by one or two, some by 10, 11, 12. but 35 in a row, something happened. i think part of it was governor mcdonald, i think part of it is that cuchinelli is perceived to be more to the right than mcauliffe is to the left. i think you have a lot of voters who don't like terry mcauliffe but did like cuchinelli more. >> nationwide on xm channel 120. we welcome your listenership as well. in the baltimore-washington area. wcstfm 91 on the dial. too much for virginia voters in his assessment, charlie cook, is that the election was decided on may 18. that's the day that commonwealth republican voters had a chance to decide betwe
. that means deficits go up. >> i will remind you that premiums were going up at double digit increases prior to the affordable care act what we are seeing is a moderation in increases in the last three years. >> that is a false dichotomy. there are other solutions getting premiums down and lowering costs. i don't accept that as a complete answer on the cost of these pleem yums. transparency is clearly very important. will you or hhs or cms, somebody in the administration provide information on the taxpayers' cost with regard to these subsidies for 2015 and beyond? >> i am sure part of our information and reports we produce will include that information to you, yes. >> thank you. >> thank you very much, mr. chairman. i would like to associate myself with the remarks of mr. thompson and mr. neal. i'll focus on an area i think this committee could become imminently involved in. i would like to point out what a success connecticut has been. i want to commend governor malloy and lieutenant governor wyman who headed that up. tremendous success including more than 1/3 of the people that have signed
the estimates at the congressional budget office, it would have increased the deficit by $110 billion in the first decade and close to a trillion dollars in the second decade. we know we have 42 or 43 million americans without health care, some medicaid eligible and some over the medicaid eligibility. 30 governors so far, republicans and democrats, have declared their support with moving ahead with medicaid expansion, but absent the affordable care act, those folks would be without any kind of health security, and in the private market, what we know is it takes a real toll. but i'd say the biggest issue is not just the financial toll, not the community toll, not the country toll, which is significant. i have a good friend who runs the cancer center at the university of kansas. i was with him and cancer researchers recently, and he said if you get a cancer diagnosis, you are 60% more likely to live five years and beyond if you have insurance than if you don't. i think that's a pretty powerful statement for why we need affordable health care for all of our citizens. >> well, thank you.
to health insurance because they will not be discriminated against. they said it would explode the deficit. all the reputable organizations, like the congressional budget office, have told us that it will save us $100 billion over 10 years. we have had a litany of objections from the republicans about the affordable care act, which have driven them to such a frenzy that they even close to the government. now we have you before the committee and you are being asked about the website. let me pursue this question about individuals who have gotten notices that they will have their individual insurance policies canceled. they will be able to get another plan what they? >> continuous coverage as part of the law. it is the law. that was not the case in the past. >> we will end the worst abuses of the insurance industry. we will create consumer protections in the marketplace that they will be able to buy a policy even if they have been sick in the past. women will not be charged more than men. insurance companies will not be able to deny coverage based on pre-existing conditions. they will not be
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)